Colby, Bonnie G.

August, 2011

By: Bark, Rosalind H.; Osgood, Daniel E.; Colby, Bonnie G.; Halper, Eve B.
It is important to understand tradeoffs in preferences for natural and constructed green space in semi-arid urban areas because these lands compete for scarce water resources. We perform a hedonic study using high resolution, remotely-sensed vegetation indices and house sales records. We find that homebuyers in the study area prefer greener lots, greener neighborhoods, and greener nearby riparian corridors, and they pay premiums for proximity to green space amenities. The findings have fundamental implications for the efficient allocation of limited water supplies between different types of green space and for native vegetation conservation in semi-arid metropolitan areas.

December, 2008

By: Pullen, Jennifer L.; Colby, Bonnie G.
Emerging water markets in the western United States have slowly developed as usage patterns have changed over time. This article develops an econometric model for the Gila-San Francisco Basin. Results indicate the market price of water has risen in response to drought and market conditions. Analysis shows a statistically significant relationship between the price and quantity of water transferred, year the transaction occurred, location where the transaction occurred, new use of the water right, and whether the transaction occurred during a drought year. Using the Standard Precipitation Index, we find negotiated prices are higher during dry years.