Peel, Derrell S.

By: Mulenga, Brian P. ; Raper, Kellie Curry ; Peel, Derrell S.
Existing studies on calf management practice adoption tend to treat practices individually and, by implication, ignore the possibility that some practices are more likely than others to be jointly adopted. This study applies market basket analysis to examine bundling of calf management practices based on the likelihood of joint adoption using producer survey data. Results indicate that the base practices of horn management, deworming, and castration are the three most widely adopted practices and are more likely to be jointly adopted in varying combinations with other practices. We discuss implications for extension programming and future studies concerned with understanding practice adoption decisions.
By: Williams, Brian R.; DeVuyst, Eric A.; Peel, Derrell S.; Raper, Kellie Curry
Past value-added research employs hedonic pricing models to estimate premiums associated with value-added feeder cattle characteristics. However, hedonic pricing models require restrictive assumptions and impose a functional form. Producers also self-select into a treatment group, potentially biasing estimates. Using propensity score matching, we reduce potential bias from producer self-selection and from imposing a functional form. Results suggest that hedonic pricing models may be negatively biased in estimates of premiums received by value-added calf producers. Current adopters receive a premium of $5.38/cwt from participation in a certified preconditioning program, while nonadopters would realize $5.17/cwt by adopting certification. Hedonic model values range from $0.52/cwt to $4.32/cwt, for similar or identical preconditioning programs.
By: Williams, Galen S.; Raper, Kellie Curry; DeVuyst, Eric A.; Peel, Derrell S.; McKinney, Doug
Many value-added practices cannot be observed by feeder cattle buyers. Third-party verification can decrease market inefficiency associated with this asymmetric information. We evaluate the effectiveness of a verification program, the Oklahoma Quality Beef Network, in increasing received prices. We estimate the value of verification, weaning, vaccinating, certification and phenotypic traits of feeder cattle at Oklahoma auctions. Results indicate that the OQBN program adds $2.39 to $5.74/cwt. Vaccinating calves adds $1.44/cwt, and weaning calves adds $2.05/cwt. Differential values for lot size, average weight, hide color, frame size, conditioning, Brahman influence, gender and other characteristics are also reported.
By: Anderson, John D.; Ward, Clement E.; Koontz, Stephen R.; Peel, Derrell S.; Trapp, James N.
Federal budgetary pressures raise questions regarding the importance of public market information. This study assesses the impact of price discovery and production efficiency of reducing public price and quantity information. The amount and type of information provided to Fed Cattle Market Simulator (FCMS) participants was varied by periodically withholding current and weekly summary information according to a predetermined experimental design. Results show that reducing information increased price variance and decreased marketing efficiency; that is, more cattle were delivered at weights deviating from 1,150 pounds- the least-cost marketing weight in the simulator. These factors, which increase costs, make the industry less competitive.