Trujillo-Barrera, Andres

By: Aderajew, Tamirat S.; Du, Xiaoxue; Pennings, Joost M. E.; Trujillo-Barrera, Andres
The risk-balancing hypothesis (RBH) suggests that farms will take less business risk as their financial risk increases, but existing literature provides empirical evidence that the RBH might be invalid under certain circumstances. We present a unified model that explains the conditions under which the RBH holds or is invalidated by recognizing the role of latent heterogeneity among farms. We generalize the RBH idea and trace the source of credit risk back to latent heterogeneity among farms. We then apply recent literature to longitudinal data from a panel of Dutch farms and classify segments using a finite mixture regression fixed-effects model and find that the RBH may not apply to all groups in the same way.
By: Costa, Geraldo Jr.; Trujillo-Barrera, Andres; Pennings, Joost M.E.
We analyze the relationships among liquidity costs, volume, and volatility in the Brazilian agricultural futures market, along with the role of market concentration. We estimate a structural three-equation IV–GMM model using data from Bolsa, Brasil, Balcão corn and live cattle contracts from March 2014 to February 2016. Results show a negative association between liquidity costs and volume and a positive association between liquidity costs and volatility. Market concentration impacts corn and live cattle differently. Concentration contributes to volume reduction for live cattle and to liquidity costs reduction for corn. Our findings shed light on the microstructure of emerging markets.
By: Trujillo-Barrera, Andres; Mallory, Mindy L.; Garcia, Philip
This article analyzes recent volatility spillovers in the United States from crude oil using futures prices. Crude oil spillovers to both corn and ethanol markets are somewhat similar in timing and magnitude, but moderately stronger to the ethanol market. The shares of corn and ethanol price variability directly attributed to volatility in the crude oil market are generally between 10%- 20%, but reached nearly 45% during the financial crisis, when world demand for oil changed dramatically. Volatility transmission is also found from the corn to the ethanol market, but not the opposite. The findings provide insights into the extent of volatility linkages among energy and agricultural markets in a period characterized by strong price variability and significant production of corn-based ethanol.