Waters, Edward C.

By: Waters, Edward C.; Weber, Bruce A.; Holland, David W.
Most studies of a state's economic base count as "basic" only the "traditional" exports of goods, federal spending, and business investment. "Nontraditional" elements of the economic base (including exports of services, federal transfers to state/local governments and households, and extraregional property income) are typically ignored. We construct a social accounting matrix (SAM) for Oregon and estimate Oregon's economic base accounting for both traditional and nontraditional elements. Almost 20% of Oregon's jobs depend on extraregional income to households (including government transfers and outside property income), 11% depend on lumber and wood and paper products, and 8% depend on agriculture.
By: Waters, Edward C.; Holland, David W.; Weber, Bruce A.
A core-periphery, multiregional, input-output model of western Oregon is used to estimate impacts of periphery timber harvest reductions resulting from listing of an endangered species. Under the most probable scenario, 31,620 total jobs would be lost in the two regions. Fourteen percent of this impact is absorbed in the core (Metro) region. Forty percent of periphery and 80% of Metro jobs lost are from service sectors, a result of important core-periphery trade in central place services. Explicit inclusion of unemployment benefits for displaced workers reduces employment loss estimates by 12% to 14%.