Pick, Daniel H.

By: Arnade, Carlos Anthony; Gopinath, Munisamy; Pick, Daniel H.
This study identifies consumer welfare from new brand introductions in the potato chip market. Price and variety effects of new brand introduction are measured by estimating a demand system underlying an expenditure function. Variety effects are positive in most cities, while price effects are generally negative when consumers exhibit some variety preference. Variety effects dominate price effects in most cities; an opposite effect observed in some cities may indicate high entry barriers or joint brand- and price-based marketing strategies. Results indicate that consumers and producers gain from product innovations, but substantial regional variation exists in the distributional effects of new brand introduction.
By: Zago, Angelo M.; Pick, Daniel H.
This study considers the welfare impact of labeling policies of agricultural commodities with specific characteristics. Using a model of vertical differentiation, the effects on equilibrium and welfare levels are calculated. The introduction of the regulation and the emergence of two differentiated competitive markets leaves consumers and high-quality producers better off, while low-quality producers are worse off. With high costs and low quality differences, the total welfare impact of the regulation can be negative. Findings show that when high-quality producers can exercise market power, the regulation could be more easily accepted by producers, but it would have a negative effect on consumers.
By: Sheldon, Ian M.; Pick, Daniel H.; McCorriston, Steve
This study examines the interaction between export subsidies and profit-shifting in a vertical production system consisting of agricultural commodity production, and intermediate and final good processing, where the latter two stages may be characterized by imperfect competition. Using a model with general functional forms for demand, comparative statics indicate that an export subsidy to an unprocessed agricultural commodity, under certain circumstances, can have greater profit-shifting effects at the final processing stage compared to an export subsidy targeted at the final processed good.